Projects Run by the Faculty

  1. Energy Efficiency in Buildings in East Africa (EEBEA)
  2. Joint Development of Courses for Energy-Efficient, Sustainable Housing in Africa (JENGA)
  3. Energy in Low Income Tropical Housing (ELITH)
  4. Supporting Sub Saharan African Municipalities in Sustainable Energy Transitions (SAMSET)
  5. The Higher Education Partnerships in sub-Saharan Africa Programme (HEPSSA)

The Higher Education Partnerships in sub-Saharan Africa Programme (HEPSSA) – 2017-2019 

Anglo American Group Foundation and the UK Government through the Global Challenges Research Fund
Through a hub-spoke model the aim of the HEPSSA programme is to contribute to addressing shortages in engineering skills in Malawi and the region through University-Industry Collaboration. The programme seeks to do this through building synergies between the academia and industry in order to produce quality engineers and demonstrate the role of engineering in socio-economic development. The project comes at an opportune time as it coincides with the curricula review cycle for the engineering programmes of the Hub University. Activities under this project include: revision of engineering curricula; secondment of staff to industry; participation of professional engineers in training of undergraduates; and establishment of collaborative research areas with industry.  This project will culminate in a series of workshops with partner institutions to share lessons learnt during the project. Uganda Martyrs University like the rest of the African partner universities is a Spoke University.

Objectives:

  1. Engage industry in the reviewing of engineering curricula;
  2. Attach members of staff in the Faculty of engineering to industry for a specified period of time to gain industrial experience;
  3. Engage professional engineers from industry on short term training of undergraduate engineering students and supervision of students’ projects;
  4. Establish areas for collaborative research between the University and Industry;
  5. Share the lessons learnt from the project with other industries and universities across the sub-Saharan African.

Partners:

  • Uganda Martyrs University
  • University of Malawi
  • Addis Ababa University
  • Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources
  • DMI St John the Bapist University
  • Malawi University of Science and Technology
  • University of Strathclyde
  • Moi University, Kenya

UMU FBE Staff Team:

  • Alex Ndibwami, Researcher (Team Leader) | Project I
  • Achilles Ahimbisibwe, Researcher (Team Leader) | Project II
  • Mark Olweny, Researcher 

 Energy Efficiency in Buildings in East Africa (EEBEA) – 2011-2017

Co-funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and five East African Governments and implemented through UNHabitat

“Promoting Energy Efficiency in Buildings in East Africa” is a project implemented by UN-Habitat in collaboration with UNEP and the five East African countries (Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi and Tanzania). The project’s main aim is to improve energy efficiency, energy saving and conservation measures in buildings in the member countries of the East African Community. Subsequently, it will be possible to use the existing generated electricity more efficiently and thus to expand the electricity supply to satisfy the increasing demand by both residential and economic productive activities of the partner countries.

Objectives:

  1. To Mainstream Energy Efficiency Measures into Housing policies, Building Codes and building practices in East Africa;
  2. To achieve considerable avoidance of GHG emissions as a result of improved EE building practices.

Partners:

  • Uganda Martyrs University
  • UNHabitat, Urban Energy Unit, Nairobi
  • Jomo Kenyatta University of Science and Technology
  • Ardhi University
  • University of Rwanda
  • Ministry of Lands Housing and Urban Development, Uganda

UMU FBE Staff Team:

Dr. Mark Olweny, Researcher (Team Leader)

Alex Ndibwami, Researcher

Herbert Candia, Research Assistant

Emmanuel Muhinda, Research Assistant

Joint Development of Courses for Energy-Efficient, Sustainable Housing in Africa (JENGA) 2013-2016

Financed in the ACP-EU Cooperation Programme for Higher Education EDULINK II

The rapid development of major cities in emerging regions in Sub-Sahara Africa leads to a rapid increase in urban population as well as a growing pressure for development in the surrounding peri-urban and rural regions.  Together with the resulting rising need for housing, which leads to an enormous increase of production in the building sector, there are serious environmental impacts deriving from this trend.  The main aim of JENGA therefore, is to build capacity, transfer knowledge and technology between the EU and Africa, and between African Universities, in subjects related to the built environment, in the field of sustainable housing. It will therefore address urgent, and common design and construction issues in housing within Africa, which have culminated in the rising need for energy.

Objectives:

To build teaching capacity in building construction and integrated design-build studios.  It aims at strengthening the practical orientation and interdisciplinary approach within architectural education.  By creating a network of partner universities in East Africa and supporting it with expertise from Germany and South Africa, the goal is to develop intercultural curricula, which reflect the fast growing pace of countries in the global South.

Partners:

  • Uganda Martyrs University
  • University of Augsburg
  • University of Stellenbosch
  • American University in Cairo
  • Jomo Kenyatta University of Science and Technology
  • University of Rwanda

UMU FBE Staff Team:

  • Mark Olweny, Researcher (Team Leader)
  • Alex Ndibwami, Researcher 
  • Achilles Ahimbisibwe, Research Assistant

Energy in Low Income Tropical Housing (ELITH) – 2013-2016

Co-funded by UK AID from the UK Department for International Development (DFID), the Engineering & Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC) and the Department for Energy & Climate Change (DECC)

Whereas we see much focus on the energy needed to heat, cool and operate buildings, it is now well recognised that in low energy buildings the ‘Embodied Energy’ (EE) may constitute over half the total lifetime energy. This has as yet received little focus in developing countries. The Energy and Low Income Tropical Housing project therefore, is a research project with its key focus on sustainable development that was set up to identify, research and propagate methods of addressing the energy consumption and climate emissions of low-income housing in hot climate developing countries.

Objectives:

  1. To measure operational-energy in current housing;
  2. To develop ways of reducing housing-use energy and costs on building services and appliances;
  3. To review and develop passive design strategies in tropical housing;
  4. To measure embodied energy in materials;
  5. To develop ways of reducing housing embodied energy and costs;
  6. To identify ways of improving rural building materials production in Africa.

Partners:

  • Uganda Martyrs University
  • University of Warwick
  • Nottingham University in China in Ningbo
  • Cambridge University in Cambridge.
  • King Mongkutʼs University of Technology Thomburi in Bangkok
  • National Housing & Building Research Agency in Dar es Salaam

UMU FBE Staff Team:

  • Alex Ndibwami, Researcher (Team Leader)
  • Mark Olweny, Researcher
  • Thomas Niwamara, Research Assistant
  • Achilles Ahimbisibwe, Parttime Research Assistant

Supporting Sub Saharan African Municipalities in Sustainable Energy Transitions (SAMSET) – 2013-2017

Co-funded by UK AID from the UK Department for International Development (DFID), the Engineering & Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC) and the Department for Energy & Climate Change (DECC)

“Supporting African Municipalities in Sustainable Energy Transitions” is a project that seeks to develop a knowledge exchange framework for supporting local and national bodies involved in municipal energy planning in the effective transition to sustainable energy use in urban areas. Through close partnering with six cities in three African countries (Ghana, Uganda and South Africa), the project is developing an information base from which to support cities, undertake direct support for cities around strategy development and priority initiatives, and facilitate knowledge exchange and capacity building.  Urbanisation rates in Africa are the highest in the world, and in most Sub Saharan countries service delivery is inadequate to keep up with the needs. African populations remain among the poorest in the world, and efforts to achieve the energy-related dimensions of the Millennium Development Goals have in most cases not had significant impact on urban populations.  The situation can be summarised as one where much urban energy transformation research does not understand the detailed organisational dynamics and constraints in cities and therefore is often of limited use; where there is a gap between policy and implementation; where capacity within local/national government departments involved in energy and urban development is inadequate in the face of increasing challenges; and where modes of knowledge transfer are not effective in facilitating sustainable energy transitions in cities.

Objectives:

  1. Identify the relevance, transferability and adaptation of the existing body of knowledge on sustainable energy transitions to the Sub Saharan African urban situation;
  2. Understand the specific and contextual issues involved in effective implementation of policies relevant to energy transitions in the African urban context;
  3. Clarify how best to facilitate policy and strategy development and implementation through active engagement and support for six partner cities in three Sub Saharan African countries to enable detailed understanding of the complex set of constraints and dynamics in these cities;
  4. To explore knowledge exchange methodologies via inter-city and inter-country network exchanges, specialist inputs and practical lesson exchanges;
  5. To develop knowledge exchange methodologies for facilitating more effective interactions between researchers and practitioners to improve implementation of policy objectives at the city level;
  6. To disseminate project findings and information beyond the project in Africa and internationally.

Partners:

  • Uganda Martyrs University
  • University College London
  • Sustainable Energy Africa, Cape Town
  • University of Ghana
  • University of Cape Town
  • University of Sheffield,
  • Gamos Ltd

UMU FBE Staff Team:

  • Alex Ndibwami, Researcher (Team Leader)
  • Mark Olweny, Researcher
  • Herbert Candia, Research Assistant
  • Achilles Ahimbisibwe, Parttime Research Assistant
  • David Mann, Researcher
  • Josephine Namukisa, Research Assistant